Jan 3, 2017

H.J. Ward tribute sketch

H.J. Ward was a pulp artist who painted a lot of spicy magazine covers back in the 30s and 40s. After viewing his work in a coffee table book, his imagery seeped into my brain, apparently, and when my friend asked me to draw a sketch for him to ink, this was the result.

The pencils took about 10 minutes; my colleague's inks took about 20 or so.







Here are some paintings by Ward:










6 comments:

  1. Where is your colleague's inked version of your pencils?

    ReplyDelete
  2. That's it above, it's a photo of the inked piece (with rough pencils showing through.)

    Also replying to your other comments scattered around the blog: "Intellecto-fruitcake" (or whatever you called it) is probably about right to describe my current work :-)
    I can't disagree, I've always got a lot of weighty issues on my mind! Actually I thought maybe my work was not serious ENOUGH, was thinking about trying to jam in MORE heady philosophical ponderings...!

    But you're right, should just back off all that... it's just comics... I should just get back to the fundamentals of the funny-book craft. Yeah, that's the ticket.

    I drew a Gross-out Joke Book once (for a small local publisher) but it's not priced at $44.99 as far as I know. Do you have a link? Last time I saw any, they were on a remaindered table for less than the cover price.

    I will keep that in mind, that the public wants digital/ choices. It's true actually, I was denying them the choice--- thinking that they really NEEDED to read print! For their own good! Oh well, hope you enjoy the comic despite its physical presence in your environment.

    Yes, now that you mention it "Dino Fakers" seems to tie into the whole "fake news" business... Another weird zeitgeist overlap: it has a running joke about the word "nasty," written BEFORE the debate where T-Rump called Hillary a "nasty woman."

    ***
    Just searched the gross-out book.. My god! You're right! Selling used for $44.99... That must be some very weird sales tactic because nobody in their right mind would pay that. It's not like it's been long enough for there to be kids who grew up with it, became dentists, got nostalgic, and decided to shell out big cash to revisit their childhoods.

    ReplyDelete
  3. That's it above, it's a photo of the inked piece (with rough pencils showing through.)

    Also replying to your other comments scattered around the blog: "Intellecto-fruitcake" (or whatever you called it) is probably about right to describe my current work :-)
    I can't disagree, I've always got a lot of weighty issues on my mind! Actually I thought maybe my work was not serious ENOUGH, was thinking about trying to jam in MORE heady philosophical ponderings...!

    But you're right, should just back off all that... it's just comics... I should just get back to the fundamentals of the funny-book craft. Yeah, that's the ticket.

    I drew a Gross-out Joke Book once (for a small local publisher) but it's not priced at $44.99 as far as I know. Do you have a link? Last time I saw any, they were on a remaindered table for less than the cover price.

    I will keep that in mind, that the public wants digital/ choices. It's true actually, I was denying them the choice--- thinking that they really NEEDED to read print! For their own good! Oh well, hope you enjoy the comic despite its physical presence in your environment.

    Yes, now that you mention it "Dino Fakers" seems to tie into the whole "fake news" business... Another weird zeitgeist overlap: it has a running joke about the word "nasty," written BEFORE the debate where T-Rump called Hillary a "nasty woman."

    ***
    Just searched the gross-out book.. My god! You're right! Selling used for $44.99... That must be some very weird sales tactic because nobody in their right mind would pay that. It's not like it's been long enough for there to be kids who grew up with it, became dentists, got nostalgic, and decided to shell out big cash to revisit their childhoods.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Apparently, Mister Rocks, my brain had atrophied to the point where I thought that inks meant colors. Silly me! This is what reading Goldbug will do to a man, no doubt.

    You should be doing comics for The New Yorker, such is the heft of your intellectual prowess in comic form. The core problem, I think, is not that your work is too heady, nor even that you have been pondering beefing up your brain prowess in comic form with an even headier steroid version of the same, but rather, you've somehow or other managed to forget the rest of us - those who are not up in the intellectual and philosophical stratosphere with you.

    What if we just want to laugh? What if (God forbid!) we just want stories that are entertaining, stories that lighten our day, stories that reveal that you are the reincarnation of Carl Barks?

    Of course, Carl Barks was prolific, whereas your Blogsite of Artistic Rarity characterizes you as more of the Youtan Poluo of the artistic world. No doubt you hoard vast tomes of artistic originality in vaults never seen by eyes of other men, and that you only share a mere pittance of your artistic offspring with us, the Monks on the Rocks, faithful followers of your artistic holiness.

    It's not just comics. It's entertainment. It's enlightenment. It's a mystery - a mystery why you are starving the world of your handicraft by producing in quantities of miniature.

    There's nothing that you can't draw. Yet, there's much irony in your penchant for being preoccupied with philosophy. Damn them all to Hell! Drown them all in your philosophical oceans which none other knows the true depths of! God forbid that you let the art peasants just swim at their leisure in water flavors of their own choosing!

    Rather than your work not being serious enough, have you pondered the possibility that it might just not have enough variety to it? Not that you don't do variety. Rather, you don't do variety enough.

    Whenever that printed Goldbug comic book finally arrives, as soon as I am done reading it, I will be sure to burn it, so as to avoid it ever falling into the wrong hands. We wouldn't want too many people reading your comics, now would we, Tim? Fortunately, your price point helps to ensure that we shouldn't have to worry about that, anytime soon.

    Just curious, but what do you consider to be your introductory work, your work that is best suited to introducing comic readers out there to your entire line? What brings the kiddies in when they're young? What are your older readers nostalgic for from your younger days as an artist on tour?

    I'm just glad that you continue to practice the fine art of obscurity on Facebook, the largest social media network on the most populated planet in our solar system. Not having a dedicated to your art page on Facebook is genius!

    Remember Scrooge McDuck? He had a great big money bin on top of a hill. It was a high visibility object. You could see it from all of Duckburg.

    Your low visibility will pay off, one day. I'm certain of that!

    It's every artist's dream to be invisible.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Well I did put some "share" buttons over these blog posts.. does not seem to have done anything for me so far.

    My "introductory work"? I guess in the column at left, under the heading "From the Archives." Some free, short pieces, in a variety of styles and subject matter. Then there is the "Comics" tab above, and the print-on-demand books at left for anyone who wants the full Peak Fun experience...

    ReplyDelete
  6. I am going to draw an analogy that may be helpful to you.

    Those share buttons that you placed here, they're kind of like placing signs way out in the wilderness. They are isolated. Whereas on Facebook, itself, think of your direct postings being more akin to travel brochures.

    Or if you prefer, another analogy. You can either drive the car, yourself, or you can be dependent upon someone else to drive the car for you. That's how your art takes you to where you eventually want to go with it.

    Maybe your art is on display under your personal Facebook account, but that doesn't help you with those who are not able to see what you post there, art-wise.

    ReplyDelete